Home » At Peace with All Their Neighbors: Catholics and Catholicism in the National Capital, 1787-1860 by William W. Warner
At Peace with All Their Neighbors: Catholics and Catholicism in the National Capital, 1787-1860 William W. Warner

At Peace with All Their Neighbors: Catholics and Catholicism in the National Capital, 1787-1860

William W. Warner

Published October 1st 1994
ISBN : 9780878405572
Hardcover
320 pages
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 About the Book 

In 1790, two events marked important points in the development of two young American institutions - Congress decided that the new nations seat of government would be on the banks of the Potomac and John Carroll of Maryland was consecrated asMoreIn 1790, two events marked important points in the development of two young American institutions - Congress decided that the new nations seat of government would be on the banks of the Potomac and John Carroll of Maryland was consecrated as Americas first Catholic bishop. This coincidence of events signalled the unexpectedly important role that Marylands Catholics, many of them by then fifth- and sixth-generation Americans, were to play in the growth and early government of the national capital. In this book William W. Warner explores how Marylands Catholics drew upon their long-standing traditions - advocacy of separation of church and state, a sense of civic duty, and a determination to live at peace with all their neighbors, in Bishop Carrolls phrase - to take a prominent role in the early government, financing, and building of the new capital. Beginning with brief histories of the areas first Catholic churches and the establishment of Georgetown College, At Peace with All Their Neighbors explains the many reasons behind the Protestant majoritys acceptance of Catholicism in the national capital in an age often marked by religious intolerance. This chronicle of Washingtons Catholic community and its major contributions to the growth of the nations capital will be of value for everyone interested in the history of Washington, D.C., Catholic history, and the history of religious toleration in America.